A new data released by Airbnb shows that the number of guests has significantly increased across the Western Cape. The data discusses how home sharing has impacted the residents of this locality. Airbnb brings positive impact to the local communities, families and businesses.

The released data primarily focuses on the amount of money spent by guests and the earnings that the hosts make. About last year, the data shows that Airbnb community made close to R5 billions of economic undertakings in the locality. It was achieved by boosting the local economy as well as investing the money back to the residents.

Other information on the data indicates that Airbnb is vastly growing in the Western Cape. In the year 2017, about 15,000 hosts in Western Cape was home to over 540, 000 visitors from all corners of the world. This is a tremendous growth of 86% from the year 2016. Airbnb hosting is undoubtedly improving the region’s economy.

The standard listing was shared for about two days in a month. A conventional host could then earn about $2,600 (R 34,400) each year. These hosts improved the economy of the local community as they generated about R1 billion. A typical guest used to spend around R 1,715 a day in the region’s businesses and communities.

Home sharing is an essential tool in spreading the advantages of tourism. Tourism grew over the last year because of the introduction of new trending destinations apart from the ordinary tourist hot spots.
The local communities are now choosing the staycations. More than a third of the tourists that toured the area originated from South Africa. It highlighted that the locals preferred staycation to relish the cities at their neighbourhood. Visitors from the United States were second in numbers to tour this region as they recorded 54,600 guests. Great Britain was a close third as they registered 54,400 guests.
The data being released today goes hand-in-hand with the community’s compact. Frequent sharing of data on the effects of home sharing is useful in creating a transparent and open society.